Availability

  • Deluxe Suite

    Non refundable.

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    Price from: 85.0 € (euro)
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    Room facilities:Air Condition, Catering service, Desk, Free toiletries, Hairdryer, Heating, Hotspots, Ironing board, Kitchenette, Minibar, Pay-per-view Channels, Private bathroom, Room service, Safety Deposit Box, Seating area, Telephone, TV, Wake up service, Washer, WiFi

    Stylish and individually designed room featuring a satellite TV, mini bar and a 24-hour room service menu.

    Bed size:2x King Size

    Room size:50 m2

  • Standard Double room

    Breakfast not icluded. Non refundable.

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    Price from: 60.0 € (euro)
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    Room facilities:Air Condition, Desk, Hairdryer, Heating, Minibar, Pay-per-view Channels, Private bathroom, Safety Deposit Box, Seating area, Telephone, TV, WiFi

    Stylish and individually designed room featuring a satellite TV, mini bar and a 24-hour room service menu.

    Bed size:King Size

    Room size:25 m2

  • Standard single room

    Breakfast included. Non refundable.

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    Price from: 45.0 € (euro)
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    Room facilities:Air Condition, Desk, Free toiletries, Heating, Minibar, Pay-per-view Channels, Room service, Safety Deposit Box, Telephone, TV, Wake up service

    Stylish and individually designed room featuring a satellite TV, mini bar and a 24-hour room service menu.

    Bed size:King Size

    Room size:15 m2

  • Triple room

    Breakfast not icluded. Non refundable.

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    Price from: 70.0 € (euro)
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    Room facilities:Air Condition, Desk, Free toiletries, Hairdryer, Heating, Minibar, Pay-per-view Channels, Private bathroom, Room service, Safety Deposit Box, Telephone, TV, Wake up service

    Stylish and individually designed room featuring a satellite TV, mini bar and a 24-hour room service menu.

    Bed size:King Size

    Room size:40m2

General

Offering free WiFi, Hotel At Metro is located in the old prestigious district of Tbilisi. The hotel offers modern rooms with air conditioning. Rustaveli Avenue is within a 15-minute walk.

Each room comes with a flat-screen TV and a minibar and features the view of the city or the garden. Featuring a shower, private bathrooms come with a hairdryer and free toiletries. The rooms have 3 m high ceiling.

Hotel At Metro features a restaurant with Georgian and European cuisine. Guests can find a a wide variety of shops within a 5-minute walk on Agmashemebeli avenue. The property offers a 24-hour front desk and airport shuttle service. Free private parking is available.

Guests can enjoy coffee, tea, Chacha (Georgian vodka) and a fruit basket on site.

Marjanishvili Metro Station is within a 3-minute walk of the property. Guests can find a a wide variety of shops within a 5-minute walk. Tbilisi Airport is 20 km away, and shuttle service is provided at surcharge. Tbilisi Train Station is 3 km away.

Chugureti is a great choice for travellers interested in architecturenature and friendly locals.

This is our guests’ favourite part of Tbilisi City, according to independent reviews.

Cancellation / Prepayment

Cancellation and prepayment policies vary according to accommodation type. Please check what conditions may apply to each option when making your selection.

Children and extra beds

Children and extra beds

All children are welcome.

All further children or adults are charged GEL 40 per night for extra beds.

The maximum number of extra beds in a room is 1.

Any type of extra bed is upon request and needs to be confirmed by management.

Supplements are not calculated automatically in the total costs and will have to be paid for separately during your stay.

Pets

Pets

Pets are not allowed.

Accepted credit cards

Gold Star Hotel accepts these cards and reserves the right to temporarily hold an amount prior to arrival.

American Express

Visa

Master Card

Diners Club

Maestro

Discover

Check-in time

2.00 pm

Check-out time

12.00 pm

Facilities

  • Air Condition
  • Airport Shuttle Service
  • Bar
  • Car hire
  • Convention floor
  • Desk
  • Free toiletries
  • Ironing board
  • Laundry
  • Minibar
  • Pay-per-view Channels
  • Private bathroom
  • Restaurant
  • Room service
  • Safety Deposit Box
  • Seating area
  • Telephone
  • TV
  • Valet parking
  • Wake up service
  • WiFi

Activities

Activities
Live music/performance (Additional charge)
Cooking class (Additional charge)
Tour or class about local culture (Additional charge)
Bike tours (Additional charge)
Walking tours (Additional charge)
Horse riding (Additional charge)
Cycling Off-site
Hiking (Additional charge)
Skiing Off-site
Fishing (Additional charge)

Internet

Internet
Free! WiFi is available in the hotel rooms and is free of charge.

Parking

Parking
Free! Free private parking is possible on site (reservation is not needed).

Accessible parking
Street parking
Secured parking

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Georgia

Georgia  Capital and largest city Tbilisi 41°43′N 44°47′E Official languages Georgian (nationwide) Abkhazian (Abkhazian AR) Ethnic groups (2014) 86.8% Georgians 6.2% Azerbaijanis 4.5% Armenians 2.8% other Religion Georgian Orthodox Church Demonym(s) Georgian Government Unitary parliamentaryconstitutional republic • President Salome Zurabishvili • Chairperson of the Parliament Irakli Kobakhidze • Prime Minister Mamuka Bakhtadze Legislature Parliament Establishment history • Colchis and Iberia 13th c. BC–580 AD • Kingdoms of Abkhazia and Bagratid Iberia 786–1008 • United Georgian

Sports & nature

Sports & nature

Sport in Georgia

The most popular sports in Georgia are football, basketball, rugby union, wrestling, judo, and weightlifting. Historically, Georgia has been famous for its physical education; the Romans were fascinated with Georgians' physical qualities after seeing the training techniques of ancient Iberia. Wrestling remains a historically important sport of Georgia, and some historians think that the Greco-Roman style of wrestling incorporates many Georgian elements. Within Georgia, one of the most popularized styles of wrestling is the Kakhetian style. There were a number of other styles in the past that are not as widely used today. For example, the Khevsureti region of Georgia has three different styles of wrestling. Other popular sports in 19th century Georgia were polo, and Lelo, a traditional Georgian game later replaced by rugby union. The first and only race circuit in the Caucasian region is located in Georgia. Rustavi International Motorpark originally built in 1978 was re-opened in 2012 after total reconstruction costing $20 million. The track satisfies the FIA Grade 2 requirements and currently hosts the Legends car racing series and Formula Alfa competitions. Basketball was always one of the notable sports in Georgia, and Georgia had a few very famous Soviet Union national team members, such as Otar Korkia, Mikheil Korkia, Zurab Sakandelidze and Levan Moseshvili. Dinamo Tbilisi won the prestigious Euroleague competition in 1962. Georgia had five players in the NBA: Vladimir Stepania, Jake Tsakalidis, Nikoloz Tskitishvili, Tornike Shengelia and current Golden State Warriors center Zaza Pachulia. Other notable basketball players are two times Euroleague champion Giorgi Shermadini and Euroleague players Manuchar Markoishvili and Viktor Sanikidze. Sport is regaining its popularity in the country in recent years. Georgia national basketball team qualified to EuroBasket during the last three tournaments since 2011.

Geography of Georgia

Georgia is mostly situated in the South Caucasus, while parts of the country are also located in the North Caucasus. The country lies between latitudes 41° and 44° N, and longitudes 40° and 47° E, with an area of 67,900 km2 (26,216 sq mi). It is a very mountainous country. The Likhi Range divides the country into eastern and western halves. Historically, the western portion of Georgia was known as Colchis while the eastern plateau was called Iberia. Because of a complex geographic setting, mountains also isolate the northern region of Svaneti from the rest of Georgia. The Greater Caucasus Mountain Range forms the northern border of Georgia.[176] The main roads through the mountain range into Russian territory lead through the Roki Tunnel between Shida Kartli and North Ossetia and the Darial Gorge (in the Georgian region of Khevi). The Roki Tunnel was vital for the Russian military in the 2008 Russo-Georgian War because it is the only direct route through the Caucasus Mountains. The southern portion of the country is bounded by the Lesser Caucasus Mountains. The Greater Caucasus Mountain Range is much higher in elevation than the Lesser Caucasus Mountains, with the highest peaks rising more than 5,000 meters (16,404 ft) above sea level. The highest mountain in Georgia is Mount Shkhara at 5,068 meters (16,627 ft), and the second highest is Mount Janga (Dzhangi–Tau) at 5,059 m (16,598 ft) above sea level. Other prominent peaks include Mount Kazbek at 5,047 m (16,558 ft), Shota Rustaveli 4,860 m (15,945 ft), Tetnuldi 4,858 m (15,938 ft), Mt. Ushba 4,700 m (15,420 ft), and Ailama 4,547 m (14,918 ft). Out of the abovementioned peaks, only Kazbek is of volcanic origin. The region between Kazbek and Shkhara (a distance of about 200 km (124 mi) along the Main Caucasus Range) is dominated by numerous glaciers. Out of the 2,100 glaciers that exist in the Caucasus today, approximately 30% are located within Georgia. The term Lesser Caucasus Mountains is often used to describe the mountainous (highland) areas of southern Georgia that are connected to the Greater Caucasus Mountain Range by the Likhi Range. The area can be split into two separate sub-regions; the Lesser Caucasus Mountains, which run parallel to the Greater Caucasus Range, and the Southern Georgia Volcanic Highland, which lies immediately to the south of the Lesser Caucasus Mountains. The overall region can be characterized as being made up of various, interconnected mountain ranges (largely of volcanic origin) and plateaus that do not exceed 3,400 meters (11,155 ft) in elevation. Prominent features of the area include the Javakheti Volcanic Plateau, lakes, including Tabatskuri and Paravani, as well as mineral water and hot springs. Two major rivers in Georgia are the Rioni and the Mtkvari. The Southern Georgia Volcanic Highland is a young and unstable geologic region with high seismic activity and has experienced some of the most significant earthquakes that have been recorded in Georgia. The Krubera Cave is the deepest known cave in the world. It is located in the Arabika Massif of the Gagra Range, in Abkhazia. In 2001, a Russian–Ukrainian team had set the world depth record for a cave at 1,710 meters (5,610 ft). In 2004, the penetrated depth was increased on each of three expeditions, when a Ukrainian team crossed the 2,000-meter (6,562 ft) mark for the first time in the history of speleology. In October 2005, an unexplored part was found by the CAVEX team, further increasing the known depth of the cave. This expedition confirmed the known depth of the cave at 2,140 meters (7,021 ft).

Climate

The climate of Georgia is extremely diverse, considering the nation's small size. There are two main climatic zones, roughly corresponding to the eastern and western parts of the country. The Greater Caucasus Mountain Range plays an important role in moderating Georgia's climate and protects the nation from the penetration of colder air masses from the north. The Lesser Caucasus Mountains partially protect the region from the influence of dry and hot air masses from the south. Much of western Georgia lies within the northern periphery of the humid subtropical zone with annual precipitation ranging from 1,000–4,000 mm (39.4–157.5 in). The precipitation tends to be uniformly distributed throughout the year, although the rainfall can be particularly heavy during the Autumn months. The climate of the region varies significantly with elevation and while much of the lowland areas of western Georgia are relatively warm throughout the year, the foothills and mountainous areas (including both the Greater and Lesser Caucasus Mountains) experience cool, wet summers and snowy winters (snow cover often exceeds 2 meters in many regions). Ajaria is the wettest region of the Caucasus, where the Mt. Mtirala rainforest, east of Kobuleti, receives around 4,500 mm (177.2 in) of precipitation per year. Eastern Georgia has a transitional climate from humid subtropical to continental. The region's weather patterns are influenced both by dry Caspian air masses from the east and humid Black Sea air masses from the west. The penetration of humid air masses from the Black Sea is often blocked by mountain ranges (Likhi and Meskheti) that separate the eastern and western parts of the nation. Annual precipitation is considerably less than that of western Georgia and ranges from 400–1,600 mm (15.7–63.0 in). The wettest periods generally occur during spring and autumn, while winter and summer months tend to be the driest. Much of eastern Georgia experiences hot summers (especially in the low-lying areas) and relatively cold winters. As in the western parts of the nation, elevation plays an important role in eastern Georgia where climatic conditions above 1,500 metres (4,921 ft) are considerably colder than in the low-lying areas. The regions that lie above 2,000 metres (6,562 ft) frequently experience frost even during the summer months.  

Nightlife info

Nightlife info

Music

Georgia has an ancient musical tradition, which is primarily known for its early development of polyphony. Georgian polyphony is based on three vocal parts, a unique tuning system based on perfect fifths, and a harmonic structure rich in parallel fifths and dissonances.[citation needed] Three types of polyphony have developed in Georgia: a complex version in Svaneti, a dialogue over a bass background in the Kakheti region, and a three-part partially-improvised version in western Georgia. The Georgian folk song "Chakrulo" was one of 27 musical compositions included on the Voyager Golden Records that were sent into space on Voyager 2 on 20 August 1977

Cuisine

Georgian cuisine and wine have evolved through the centuries, adapting traditions in each era. One of the most unusual traditions of dining is supra, or Georgian table, which is also a way of socialising with friends and family. The head of supra is known as tamada. He also conducts the highly philosophical toasts, and makes sure that everyone is enjoying themselves. Various historical regions of Georgia are known for their particular dishes: for example, khinkali (meat dumplings), from eastern mountainous Georgia, and khachapuri, mainly from Imereti, Samegrelo and Adjara. In addition to traditional Georgian dishes, the foods of other countries have been brought to Georgia by immigrants from Russia, Greece, and recently China.

Culture and history info

Georgia (Georgian: საქართველო, translit.: sakartvelo, IPA: [sɑkʰɑrtʰvɛlɔ] (About this soundlisten)) is a country in the Caucasus region of Eurasia. Located at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, it is bounded to the west by the Black Sea, to the north by Russia, to the south by Turkey and Armenia, and to the southeast by Azerbaijan. The capital and largest city is Tbilisi. Georgia covers a territory of 69,700 square kilometres (26,911 sq mi), and its 2017 population is about 3.718 million. Georgia is a unitary semi-presidential republic, with the government elected through a representative democracy During the classical era, several independent kingdoms became established in what is now Georgia, such as Colchis, later known as Lazica and Iberia. The Georgians adopted Christianity in the early 4th century. The common belief had an enormous importance for spiritual and political unification of early Georgian states. A unified Kingdom of Georgia reached its Golden Age during the reign of King David IV and Queen Tamar in the 12th and early 13th centuries. Thereafter, the kingdom declined and eventually disintegrated under hegemony of various regional powers, including the Mongols, the Ottoman Empire, and successive dynasties of Iran. In the late 18th century, the eastern Georgian Kingdom of Kartli-Kakheti forged an alliance with the Russian Empire, which directly annexed the kingdom in 1801 and conquered the western Kingdom of Imereti in 1810. Russian rule over Georgia was eventually acknowledged in various peace treaties with Iran and the Ottomans and the remaining Georgian territories were absorbed by the Russian Empire in a piecemeal fashion in the course of the 19th century. During the Civil War following the Russian Revolution in 1917, Georgia briefly became part of the Transcaucasian Federation and then emerged as an independent republic before the Red Army invasion in 1921 which established a government of workers' and peasants' soviets. Soviet Georgia would be incorporated into a new Transcaucasian Federation which in 1922 would be a founding republic of the Soviet Union. In 1936, the Transcaucasian Federation was dissolved and Georgia emerged as a Union Republic. During the Great Patriotic War, almost 700,000 Georgians fought in the Red Army against the German invaders. After Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, a native Georgian, died in 1953, a wave of protest spread against Nikita Khrushchev and his de-Stalinization reforms, leading to the death of nearly one hundred students in 1956. From that time on, Georgia would become marred with blatant corruption and increased alienation of the government from the people. By the 1980s, Georgians were ready to abandon the existing system altogether. A pro-independence movement led to the secession from the Soviet Union in April 1991. For most of the following decade, post-Soviet Georgia suffered from civil conflicts, secessionist wars in Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and economic crisis. Following the bloodless Rose Revolution in 2003, Georgia strongly pursued a pro-Western foreign policy; aimed at NATO and European integration, it introduced a series of democratic and economic reforms. This brought about mixed results, but strengthened state institutions. The country's Western orientation soon led to the worsening of relations with Russia, culminating in the brief Russo-Georgian War in August 2008 and Georgia's current territorial dispute with Russia. Georgia is a member of the United Nations, the Council of Europe, and the GUAM Organization for Democracy and Economic Development. It contains two de facto independent regions, Abkhazia and South Ossetia, which gained very limited international recognition after the 2008 Russo-Georgian War. Georgia and most of the world's countries consider the regions to be Georgian territory under Russian occupation.  

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