Gaziantep

Gaziantep

Things to do - general
Location of Gaziantep within Turkey.
Coordinates: 37°04′N 37°23′ECoordinates: 37°04′N 37°23′E
Country  Turkey
Region Southeastern Anatolia
Province Gaziantep
Government
 • Mayor Fatma Şahin (AKP)
Area
 • Total 7.642 km2 (2.951 sq mi)
Population (2014)
 • Total 1,556,381 (estimate, last Census [2,000CE] = 603,434)
 • Density 212/km2 (550/sq mi)
Time zone FET (UTC+3)
Postal code 27x xx
Area code(s) 342 & 343
Licence plate 27
Website www.gaziantep-bld.gov.tr
Country Turkey
Languages spokenTurkish
Currency usedTurkish lira (TRY)
Area (km2)7.642 km2 (2.951 sq mi)

Sports & nature

ClubSportEstablishedLeagueVenue

Gaziantepspor Football 1969 Spor Toto Super League (Turkish Premier Division) Gaziantep Kamil Ocak Stadium
Gaziantep Büyükşehir Belediyespor Football 1998 Bank Asya 1. Lig (TFF First League) Gaziantep Kamil Ocak Stadium
Gazikentspor Women's football 2006 Women's First League Gazikent Stadium
Gaziantep Büyükşehir Belediyespor (Played with sponsporship of Royal Halı since 2012) Basketball 2007 Turkish Basketball League Kamil Ocak Sports Hall
Gaziantep Polis Gücü SK Men's Hockey Hockey 2003 Turkish Hockey Super League

Beslenspor has played in the Turkish Basketball League between 1986 and 1992 and presented Gaziantep at basketball once.

Nightlife info

Antep is known for its cuisine that is heavily influenced by its southern neighbours. The city is renowned for its local variety of kebab (Antep kebabı). You can find many places that sell spicy kebabs here. Make sure you enter a place that is crowded and order ayran with your kebab. Try a lahmacun, which is minced, marinated, spiced meat with minced vegetables on an extremely thin, crunchy dough. Lahmacun can be made with garlic or onions, in general, you will find garlic ones in Antep.

Antep is also famous for its pistachios. You can find fresh, unroasted pistachios as well as roasted ones. Try the spicy nuts.

Beyran a spicy lamb soup with rice served for breakfast.

Katmer a thin phyllo pastry stuffed with sheep cheese, pistachios, and sugar served for breakfast.

Upon finishing your dinner, make sure to have baklava made with pistachios. Also, you can try the hot desserts with a scoop of ice cream on top.

Antep is known for its food, and meals there are one of the highlights of visiting the region. So enjoy yourself.

Kebapci Halil Usta, Karşıyaka Semti Gaziantep Mozaik Müzesi Arkası Tekel Caddesi Öcükoğlu Sokak 27500 Şehitkamil/gaziantep, Türkiye. Halil's shop is not to be missed! He grew up on the floor of a butcher shop while learning the trade. 15 TL for a single portion, 30 TL for a double portion. A portion consists of one kebap of your choice, bread and salad. 15 TL. edit
Drink
Many of Antep's drinking establishments are basically for picking up women. However there are some nice birahanes ("beer-houses") where you can enjoy a quiet drink in peace.

Meyan Şerbeti. Licorice root drink served for free in the bazaar area. Often annouced as 'Turkish Cola'. edit
Dut Suyu. Mulberry juice edit
Menengiç Kahvesi. Coffee made from the terebinth berry with a nutty flavor. edit
Zahter Çayı. Thyme flavored tea.

Culture and history info

Gaziantep was made famous in Bulgaria and Greece by the Turkish TV series Yabancı Damat (literally The Foreign Groom), known in Bulgaria as Брак с чужденец (Marriage with a Foreigner), a love story between a Turk and a Greek. In Greece, the popular TV series is known as Τα σύνορα της Αγάπης (The Borders of Love). It is a love story between two youngsters, Nikos, a Greek boy, son of a wealthy Athenian ship owner; and Nazlı, daughter of a Gaziantep baklava maker. Due to the historic rivalry and hatred between the Greeks and Turks, a love affair between these two youngsters is received badly by both families. The dislike between the two families increases as the episodes pass, with the Turkish family being more strict towards their daughter. The main culprits, however, are the two grandparents (Nikos' grandmother and Nazlı's grandfather), who reach extreme points in order to stop the youngsters' wedding. The TV series was launched in 2004 and was later also shown in Serbia, Croatia and other Balkan countries.

Early history
Gaziantep began as being part of Yamhad until the kingdom was eventually destroyed by the Hittites.[citation needed] Later, there are traces of settlement going back to the 4th millennium BC.[8][unreliable source?][9] The archaeological site of Tell Tülük, which gives its name to the Neolithic Dulicien culture, is situated a few kilometers to the north of the city center.

Gaziantep is the probable site of the Hellenistic city of Antiochia ad Taurum ("Antiochia in the Taurus Mountains").[unreliable source?][10]

In the center of the city stands the Gaziantep Fortress and the Ravanda citadel, which were restored by the Byzantines in the 6th century.

Medieval history
Following the Muslim conquest of the Levant, the city passed to the Umayyads in 661 and the Abbasids in 750. It was ravaged several times during the Arab–Byzantine wars. After the disintegration of the Abbasid dynasty, the city was ruled successively by the Tulunids, the Ikhshidids and the Hamdanids. In 962, it was recaptured by the Byzantines.[11]

The Anatolian Seljuks took Aintab in 1067. They gave way to the Syrian Seljuks in 1086. Tutush I appointed Thoros of Edessa as governor of the region.

It was captured by the Crusaders and united to the Maras Seigneurship in the County of Edessa in 1098.

It reverted to the Seljuk Sultanate of Rûm in 1150, was controlled by the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia between 1155–1157 and 1204–1206 and captured by the Zengids in 1172 and the Ayyubids in 1181. It was retaken by the Seljuk Sultanate of Rûm in 1218. It was ruled by the Ilkhanate between 1260–1261, 1271–1272, 1280–1281 and 1299–1317 and by the Mamluks between 1261–1271, 1272–1280, 1281–1299, 1317–1341, 1353–1378, 1381–1389 and 1395–1516. It was also governed by the Dulkadirids, which was a Turkish vassal state of the Mamluks.

Ottoman period
The Ottoman Empire captured Gaziantep after the Battle of Marj Dabiq in 1516, under the reign of Sultan Selim I. In the Ottoman period, Aintab was a sanjak centered initially in the Dulkadir Eyalet (1516–1818), and later in the Aleppo vilayet (1908–1918). It was also a kaza in the Aleppo vilayet (1818–1908). The city established itself as a centre for commerce due to its location straddling trade routes.

The 17th century Turkish traveler Evliya Celebi noted that there were 3,900 shops and two bedesten.

By the end of the 19th century, Aintab had a population of about 45,000, two thirds of which was Muslim—largely Turkish, but also Arabs and Kurdish. Of the Christians, there was a large Armenian community. In the 19th century, there was considerable American Protestant Christian missionary activity in Aintab.[12][13] In particular, Central Turkey College was founded in 1874 by the American Mission Board and largely served the Armenian community. The Armenians were systemically slaughtered during the Hamidian massacres in 1895 and later the Armenian Genocide in 1915.[14][15][16] Consequently, the Central Turkey College was transferred to Aleppo in 1916.

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